Flashback Friday

As western Louisiana and more are continuing the clean up from Hurricane Laura I thought I’d share this journal spread from Friday, July 31st when Isaias was heading for the Carolina coast. Having lived briefly in Florida I’m still attuned to keeping tabs on all the Tropical Storms and Hurricanes. Every one of these storms carries the possibility of devastating consequences. My heart goes out to everyone still dealing with the aftermath.

As an aside, I’m quite fond of the triadic color scheme I’ve got here… Red Orange, Yellow Green, and Blue Violet.

Meditation – 31 August 2020

So live your life that the fear of death can never enter your heart. Trouble no one about their religion, respect others in their view, and demand that they respect yours. Love your life, perfect your life, beautify all things in your life. Seek to make your life long and its purpose in the service of your people. Prepare a noble death song for the day when you go over the great divide.

Always give a word or a sign of salute when meeting or passing a friend, even a stranger, when in a lonely place. Show respect to all people and grovel to none.

When you arise in the morning give thanks for the food and for the joy of living. If you see no reason for giving thanks, the fault lies only in yourself. Abuse no one and no thing, for abuse turns the wise ones to fools and robs the spirit of its vision.

When it comes your time to die, be not like those whose hearts are filled with the fear of death, so that when their time comes they weep and pray for a little more time to live their lives over again in a different way. Sing your death song and die like a hero going home.

― Chief Tecumseh

 

 

Effeuiller la Marguerite

After a little research on Wikipedia it seems this childhood game of pulling petals from a daisy, the Marguerite, has a French origin.

I’m going with the French title since the only gender referred to here is linguistic… and it belongs to the daisy!

The lettering was applied with a brush and liquid frisket/mask. Once dry, the background color was washed across the pages and the mask was removed once the watercolor was fully dry.